Roland Fischer

Roland Fischer


FISCHER Roland; FOX R; RALSTIN Mary
Creative performance and the hallucinogenic drug-induced creative experience.
Journal of Psychedelic Drugs; 1972 Fal Vol. 5(1) 29-36
Administered the Minnesota Percepto-Diagnostic Test (MPDT), the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and a handwriting test to 2l college age volunteers with above average scholastic records prior to, 90 min after, and 270 min after an oral dose of psilocybin (160 mg/kg). 10 Ss became less and 11 more ‘brain damaged’ during the drug experience. The MacKinnon creativity scores of the 17 Ss who could participate at the drug peak showed a significant inverse relation with degree of rotation on the MPDT. 3 Ss who showed more and 3 who showed less brain damage under psilocybin were given a figure-drawing test in another drug session. The resulting 18 male and 18 female drawings were evaluated according to sophistication of body concept and aesthetic pleasingness. The 3 Ss who had lower creativity and more brain damage predrug were also more field-independent. Their figure drawings at drug peak were all unratable along the Witkin dimension but were judged consistently more aesthetically pleasing. The more creative, less field-independent and brain damaged Ss produced less pleasing drawings. Results are explained in terms of the difference between creative performance and creative experience. Findings support both of the conflicting claims concerning the relation between hallucinogenic drug experience and creativity.

FISCHER R; et al.
Creative performance and the hallucinogenic drug-induced creative experience, or one man’s brain-damage is another’s creativity.
Confina Psychiatrica (Basel) 14:174-202 (1971)
[NO ABSTRACT] Creativity. Psilocybin. Psychedelics.

Landon, G. M. & Fischer, Roland.
On Common Features of the Language of Creative Performance and Hallucinogenic-Drug- Induced Creative Experience.
In: Keup 1970:413-434. (1970)

Landon, G. M. & Fischer, Roland.
On Similar Linguistic Structures in Creative Performance and Psilocybin-Induced Experience.
Confinia Psychiatrica 13:115-138. (1970)

Fischer, Roland.
On Creative, Psychotic and Ecstatic States. In: I. Jakab (ed.), Psychiatry and Art, Vol. 2: Art Interpretation and Art Therapy, 5th Int. Coll. Psychopathology of Expression, Los Angeles, CA, 1968.
Basel & New York: Karger, 1969. Rpt. White 1972:175-194. (1968)

 


FISCHER R; et al.
Psychotropic drug-induced transformations of visual space.
Int.Pharmacopsychiatry. 6:28-37 (1971)
[NO ABSTRACT] Psilocybin. Vision.

HILL RM; et al. FISCHER R?
Induction and Extinction of Psilocybin-induced transformations of visual space.
Pharmakopsychiatr.Neuropsychopharmakol. 6:258-63 Sep 1973
[NO ABSTRACT] Psilocybin and vision

Fischer, Roland, Griffin, Frances, & Liss, Leopold.
Biological Aspects of Time in Relation to (Model) Psychoses.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 96:44-65. (1962)

Fischer, Roland, Hill, R. M., & Warshay, Diane.
Effects of the Psychodysleptic Drug Psilocybin on Visual Perception. Changes in Brightness Preference.
Experientia 25(2):166-169. (1969)

Fischer, Roland.
Prediction and Measurement of Perceptual- Behavioral Change in Drug-Induced Hallucinations.
In: Keup 1970:303-332. (1970)

Fischer, Roland.
Psilocybin-Induced Contraction of Nearby Visual Space.
Agents and Action 1(4):190-197. (1970)

Fischer, Roland.
Space-Time Coordinates of Excited and Tranquilized States.
Psychiatry and Art. Proceedings IVth Int. Coll. Psychology of Expression, Washington, D.C. Basel & New York: S. Karger, 1968, 33-51. (1966)

 


Fischer, Roland.
Manipulation of Space and Time Through Hallucinogenic Drugs.
In: Sankar et al. 1975:363-394. (1975)

Fischer, Roland.
On the Arousing Effect of Hallucinogens, or Who is Who Under Psilocybin.
J. Altered States Cs. 5(4):321-324. (1979-80)

 


Fischer, Roland.
A Cartography of the Ecstatic and Meditative States.
Science 174(4012):897-904. (1971)

Fischer, Roland.
Factors Involved in Drug-Produced Model Psychoses II.
J. Ment. Science 103:392-401. (1957)

Fischer, Roland.
Factors Involved in Drug-Produced Model Psychoses.
J. Ment. Science 100:623-631. (1954)

Fischer, Roland.
The “Flashback”: Arousal-Statebound Recall of Experience.
J. Psychedelic Drugs 3(2):31-39. (1971)

Fischer, Roland.
The Perception-Hallucination Continuum (A Re- examination).
Diseases Nerv. Syst. 30(3):161-171. (1969)

Fischer, Roland.
Transformations of Consciousness.
A Cartography. I. The Perception-Hallucination Continuum. Confinia psychiatrica 18:221-244. (1975)

Panton, Yvonne & Fischer, Roland.
Hallucinogenic Drug- Induced Behavior Under Sensory Attenuation.
Arch. Gen. Psychiat. 28:434-8. (1973)

 


FISCHER R, KAPPELER T, WISECUP P, THATCHER K
Personality trait-dependent psychomotor performance under psilocybin. I.
Dis.Nerv.Sys. 31:91-101 (1970)
[NO ABSTRACT] The use of psychometric tests to predict how individuals will respond to psychedelics

THATCHER K, KAPPELER T, WISECUP P, FISCHER R
Personality trait dependent performance under psilocybin. I.
Dis.Nerv.Sys. 31:181-192 (1970)
[NO ABSTRACT] The use of psychometric tests to predict how individuals will respond to psychedelics

Fischer, Roland, Kappeler, Thomas, Wisecup, Philip, & Thatcher, Karen.
Personality Trait Dependent Performance Under Psilocybin.
Diseases Nerv. Syst. 31:91-101, 181-192. (1970)

Fischer, Roland, Marks, Philip A., Hill, Richard M., & Rockey, Marsha A.
Personality Structure as the Main Determinant of Drug Induced (Model) Psychoses.
Nature 218:296-298. (1968)

FISCHER R, LANDON G
On the arousal-state-dependent recall of ‘subconscious’ experience: Stateboundness
Brit.J.Psychiat. 120:159-172 (1972)
[NO ABSTRACT] Regarding aspects of the psychedelic experience that are difficult to recall after the psychedelic state has passed.

 


Fischer W
[The anticonvulsant action of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan in various seizure models in the mouse]
Pharmazie; 1991 Jul; 46(7); P 540-1
[No Abstract]

Fischer, Roland, Hill, Richard, Thatcher, Karen, & Scheib, James
Psilocybin-Induced Contraction of Nearby Space.
Agents and Actions 1(4):190-7. (1970)

 


Baas H; Schneider E; Fischer P-A; Japp G.
Mesulergine and bromocriptine in long-term treatment of advanced parkinsonism.
West J Neural Transm. (Austria). 64(1): p45-54, 1985.
Topic: Bromocriptine, prosexual substances, nootropics

COHEN Irving; FISCHER JF; VOGEL WH
Physiological disposition of b-phenylethylamine 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethylamine, 2,3,4,5,6-pentamethoxyphenylethylamine and b-hydroxymescaline in rat brain, liver and plasma.
Psychopharmacologia; 1974 Vol. 36(1) 77-84
Hydroxymescaline (HM) and b-phenylethylamine (PEA) affected the conditioned-avoidance responses (CAR) in male Wistar rats after intraperitoneal injection of 100 and 40 mg/kg, respectively. The fates of these 2 compounds and of 2,3,4,5,6-pentamethoxyphenylethylamine (PMPEA), a behaviorally active mescaline derivative, and of 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethylamine (TMPEA), a behaviorally inactive compound, were studied. All compounds were quickly absorbed and distributed after intraperitoneal injection and were also quickly removed from brain, liver, and plasma. The compounds crossed the blood-brain barrier differently and TMPEA could not be detected in the CNS, explaining, perhaps, its lack of behavioral activity. A comparison of the minimal doses (mmoles/kg) of these compounds which affected the CAR in rats indicated that PMPEA (10) > mescaline (60) > PEA (240) > HM (420). In contrast, a comparison of minimal brain levels necessary to affect the CAR revealed the following relationship (nmoles/g): PMPEA (1.8) > mescaline (2.4) > HM = PEA (40). It is suggested that structure-activity-relationship studies with psychoactive compounds should not be based on injected doses but on actual brain levels at periods of abnormal behavior.

FERTZIGER, ALLEN P; FISCHER Roland
Interaction between narcotic antagonist (naloxone) and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in the rat.
Psychopharmacology; 1977 Vol 54(3) 313-314
LSD administration in 16 Sprague-Dawley rats elicited a diphasic reaction consisting of a brief excitable period (up to 8 min) followed by a prolonged catalepsy (8 min-1 hr). While the cataleptic response was antagonized by a single injection of naloxone (given 30 min after LSD administration), pretreatment with naloxone shortened the excitable phase and potentiated the catalepsy. Implications for treating LSD-induced ‘bad trips’ are noted.

Fischer, Roland.
Out on a (Phantom) Limb: Variations on the Theme: Stability of Body Image and the Golden Section.
Perspectives Biol. & Med. 12: 259-73. (1969)

GOLDMAN H; FISCHER R; NICOLOV N; MURPHY S
Lysergic acid diethylamide affects blood flow to specific areas of the conscious rat brain.
Experientia; 1975 Vol 31(3) 328-330
Studied areas of the nervous system responsive to LSD. Some cortical regions and cerebellum, in addition to subcortical regions, were indicated to be responsive to LSD. (German summary)

GWYNNE P, FISCHER R, HILL RM
Hypnotic Induction of the interference of psilocybin with optically induced spatial distortion.
Pharmako-psychiatrie Neuro-Psychopharmacologie (Thieme, Stuttgart) 2:223-234 (1969)
[No ABSTRACT] Information about psychdelic states evokable by hypnosis

HELLER B; FISCHER E; SPATZ H
N,N-dimethyltryptamine like substance in rat brain.
Life Sciences; 1973 Aug Vol. 13(4) 313-316
Used bidimensional thin layer and gas chromatography with 10 male Wistar rats to demonstrate that rat brain contains 8 mg/g of a tertiary amine, very probably N,N-dimethyltryptamine. Pretreatment with nialamide did not modify the concentration of this substance in the brain.

HILL RM; FISCHER R; WARSHAY D
Effects of Excitatory and Tranquilizing Drugs on Visual Perception, Spatial Distortion Thresholds.
Experientia; Vol 25 pg 171-172 (1969)
[NO ABSTRACT] Psilocybin decreases spatial distortion threshold.

LUTHRA YK; ESBER HJ; LARIVIERE DM; ROSENKRANTZ H
Assessment of tolerance to immunosuppressive activity of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in rats.
J Immunopharmacol. 1980; 2(2): 245-56
Immunosuppression evoked by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) has been a consistent finding in rats but the development of tolerance to this phenomenon has not been explored. Therefore, Fischer rats of both sexes were orally given delta 9-THC at 6 or 12 mg/kg or sesame oil as vehicle control for 5-26 days before and after I.P. antigenic stimulation with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). delta 9-THC doses were relevant to those of man and produced mild CNS-inhibition followed by CNS-stimulation, tolerance developing to both behavioral phases. The primary immune response was evaluated by determining splenic antibody-forming cells (AFC), hemagglutinin (HT) and/or hemolysin (HS) titers. Simultaneous administration of delta 9-THC and SE induced dose-related splenic atrophy and reduced AFC proliferation as well as HT and HS responses. These changes were not elicited by sesame oil. Tolerance did not develop to immunosuppression during 26 days of cannabinoid treatment. delta 9-THC given 3 days post SRBC inoculation induced immunosuppression at 12 but not 6 mg/kg. Immunosuppression was directly related to delta 9-THC rather than to non-specific debilitating factors since body weights are stable. The inductive phase of the primary immune response was most sensitive to impairment although the reproductive phase was also affected at the high dose level.

MCCANN, DAVID J; RABIN, RICHARD A; WINTER, J C
Interactions of clonidine with phencyclidine and ketamine: Studies of radial maze performance and righting reflex in rats.
Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior; 1987 Jan Vol 26(1) 23-28
Studied the effects of interactions of clonidine with phencyclidine (PCP) and ketamine on radial maze performance and righting reflex in male Fischer-344 rats. Following training in the maze, 40 of the 42 Ss reached a criterion of 89% efficiency in 5 consecutive sessions. PCP- and ketamine-induced decreases in performance tended to be reversed for Ss pretreated with clonidine, but administration of clonidine after administration of PCP had no such effect. Preadministration of clonidine also resulted in increased frequency and duration of anesthesia, as indicated by righting reflex observations, and in significant reductions in tritium levels in Ss’ brains. It appears that clonidine is neither an appropriate treatment for PCP intoxication nor an appropriate treatment for surgical patients undergoing ketamine anesthesia.

MURRAY TF; CRAIGMILL AL; FISCHER GJ
Pharmacological and behavioral components of tolerance to LSD and mescaline in rats.
Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior; 1977 Sep Vol 7(3) 239-244
Used an FR-10 schedule of water reinforcement to examine the relative contributions of pharmacological and behavioral mechanisms in the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of LSD (100 and 250 mug/kg, ip) and mescaline (10 and 100 mug/kg, ip) in 8 female hooded rats. Ss treated daily with LSD or mescaline before operant testing developed tolerance to the impairment of responding, while Ss treated daily after each session did not display tolerance when the drugs were administered before testing. Results indicate that behavioral compensatory mechanisms may be involved in the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of LSD and mescaline on FR performance.

STEINFELS, GEORGE F; TAM, S WILLIAM; COOK, LEONARD
Discriminative stimulus properties of (+)-N-allylnormetazocine in the rat: Correlations with (+)-N-allylnormetazocine and phencyclidine receptor binding.
Psychopharmacology; 1987 Jan Vol 91(1) 5-9
Examined whether cyclazocine, pentazocine, phencyclidine (PCP), and ketamine, which produce psychotomimetic symptoms in man, would produce dextro-N-allylnormetazocine (NANM)-like discriminative stimuli in 9 male Fischer F344 rats. The binding affinities of the drugs at NANM and PCP binding sites were also measured. Cyclazocine, PCP, and ketamine all produced NANM-like stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the discriminative properties of NANM cannot be explained by pharmacologic actions at either NANM or PCP binding sites alone and may involve concurrent actions at both sites.

STOFF, D M; ET AL
The indole hallucinogens, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT), have different effects from mescaline on rat shuttlebox avoidance.
Neuropharmacology; 1978 Dec Vol 17(12) 1035-1040
Demonstrated that the indole hallucinogenic drugs, N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine had a psychopharmacological profile different from mescaline on rat shuttlebox avoidance. The differences were strain (Long-Evans hooded, Sprague-Dawley, Fischer 344, Roman Low Avoider, and Roman High Avoider) and/or baseline-dependent.

TANG, ANDREW H; FRANKLIN, STANLEY R
Acquisition of brightness discrimination in the rat is impaired by opiates with psychotomimetic properties.
Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior; 1983 Jun Vol 18(6) 873-877
Studied the acquisition of shock avoidance behavior in male Fischer-344 rats in an automated ‘Y’-maze that incorporates a simultaneous brightness discrimination paradigm. When administered prior to each of 5 consecutive daily sessions, 2 opiate derivatives with psychotomimetic properties, cyclazocine and N-allynormatazocine, impaired the acquisition of brightness discrimination at doses that also increased movements between trials. These effects were similar to those produced by phencyclidine, ketamine, and a high dose of dextroamphetamine. Pretreatment with morphine, pentazocine, and scopolamine at motor-stimulant doses before each session did not affect acquisition of brightness discrimination. Nalorphine, naltrexone, and chlorpromazine had no effect on discrimination, even at motor-depressant doses. Whereas the motor stimulation produced by morphine or pentazocine was blocked by naltrexone, the motor stimulation and discrimination disruption produced by cyclazocine or N-allylnormetazocine were only incompletely antagonized by naltrexone. Results demonstrate similarities between psychotomimetic opiates and phencyclidinelike compounds and may reflect the sensory or cognitive disturbance produced by these drugs in humans.

 


About this entry