Stalinist purges in Mongolia

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About 800 temples and monasteries were destroyed during the years of the purges

About 800 temples and monasteries were destroyed during the years of the purges

The Stalinist Purges in Mongolia had their climax between 1937 and 1939, under the leadership of Khorloogiin Choibalsan. The purges affected the whole country, although the main focus was on upper party and government ranks, the army, and especially the Buddhist clergy. The most common accusation was espionage for Japan. The number of people killed in the purges is usually estimated to have been between 22,000[1] and 35,000 people,[2] or about three to four percent of Mongolia’s population at that time. Nearly 18,000 victims were Buddhist lamas.[1] Some authors also offer much higher estimates, up to 100,000 victims.[2] The closure of all but one monastery and destruction of all but a few meant that Mongolia’s cultural landscape would be changed forever.

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[edit] Mass graves

Mass graves were investigated in 1991 in Mörön[3], and in 2003 in Ulaanbaatar.[4] The corpses of hundreds of executed lamas and civilians were unearthed, all killed with a shot to the base of the skull.[4]

[edit] Prominent victims

[edit] Buryats

A number of prominent Buryats connected to Mongolia were imprisoned and killed during the purges in the Soviet Union, among them:

[edit] See also

[edit] References

[edit] External links

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