Nezahualcóyotl’s Ode to Entheogens

Nezahualcóyotl’s Monologue

Nezahualcóyotl’s
Ode to Entheogens

There are entheogenic songs: may they say

I drink the flowers that inebriate,
The flowers that provoke vertigo have arrived
Come, and be thou exalted.

These flowers have arrived on panicles:
Diverse flowers of pleasure that are strewn,
That rain down and intertwine.

Let the drum resound: let there be dance:
My heart is tinted with lovely entheogenic flowers.

I am a poet: I am gathering flowers

To disseminate: enjoy.

The flower of my song breaks inside my heart:
I disseminate entheogens.

With songs one day I must be enshrouded,
My heart with entheogens must be intertwined:
They are the princes, the kings!


Thus I weep at times and say:

Someday I shall leave behind

The fame of my entheogens, the renown of my songs:
My heart with entheogens must be intertwined:
They are the princes, the kings!

Nezahualcóyotl’s Monologue, in
Song to Nezahualcóyotl,
An elegy by an unknown pre-Columbian poet to

Acolmiztli Nezahualcóyotl, ‘Lion-Strong Famished Coyote’,
Poet, warrior, Lord of Texcoco [1402-1472].
Translated from Á.M. Garibay’s Spanish rendering of the Náhuatl.

From The Age of Entheogens & The Angel’s Dictionary
by Jonathan Ott, Natural Products Co., Kennwick, WA USA, 1995.


Mixtec Glyph


© Joel Snow
Created December 5, 1995
Revised March 16, 1997

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